Asymptomatic bacteruria and Bear Grylls

From the past… followed on from conversation with Nigel about Wim Hoff; small world.

almondemotion

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It is easy to forget how much medicalese and jargon exists within the world of health and social care.

As to what stops us speaking English, either to each other or more relevantly to patients, clients and carers, I am not sure – I suspect that most of the time we aren’t aware we are doing it.

We forget that the words we use to describe things are very different from those others employ, for example, ‘asymptomatic’ – something that doesn’t have symptoms. I guess when you look into this more deeply, when something doesn’t have symptoms, how do we know we have it? I guess that is where ‘bacteruria’ comes-in, in this instance – this means, bacteria in the urine (our urine is ‘normally’ sterile, that is, without any bacteria or other organisms) (the reason we aren’t encouraged to drink urine a la Bear Grylls, is another…

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One comment

  1. Understanding of non-verbal signs, sounds and signals is so important to develop.
    Including giving them too, referring back to the gentle touch, pleasant scent, quiet tone of voice and warm eye contact.

    Like

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