Deceased albatrosses, dog companions and other thoughts and travels.

Michael was a true rambler, born in Russia he migrated to Glasgow then fought in Egypt and Palestine in the First World War then back to Glasgow and then off to Australia via Ceylon.

Free-association, mind-wandering, existential worries, and Yoda’s gender

Is the recession upon us? What I think about my tortoise, what do they think about me?

Weight loss junkie (the pitfalls of too much safety)

Family-doctor-dietician and still losing weight; you must be failing the person, not meeting their needs, not creating innovative or adequately tasty food, not supporting mealtimes, not doing your job.

The Sailor from Dinnington

It was a few weeks ago. I was logged-on to a meeting. Locked, stock to the computer screen, my face flickering at 60Hz, my fingers dancing over the keyboard, and, me, for the most pretending to eye-contact, whilst reading the Guardian. During these times I exist in a split reality. My focus switching between theContinue reading “The Sailor from Dinnington”

A dying breed. Knock, knock, It’s the doctor.

What makes a GP special is their knowledge of a patient, their insight over months, years, even decades into a person’s life. The bond that continues after the acute illness has passed, the person recovered, perhaps passed through school, left for college and returned, married then divorced, raised children.

Long distance relationships

It was a toughie. It took me an hour to unravel what was what, which medicines were which, what had been stopped, started, changed, what he could and couldn’t do, what he understood, what the family understood, the plans for further tests and follow-up.

My mum – for International Women’s Day 8 March 2022

My mum Would pass thread through the eye of a tiny needle and perform what she called invisible stitches. It was what all the ladies wanted. The middle-aged women would call-in at our house Requesting alterations to aid their spread, their girth expansion from the time in-between diets. Mum would sit at her Singer sewingContinue reading “My mum – for International Women’s Day 8 March 2022”

The cost of loneliness (Roubles, dollars or robots?)

One patient recently attempted to resuscitate her (toy) baby when the batteries ran-out.

The week that was and was not!

Still recovering from IDLES my daughter tested positive for Covid.

Innovation, oranges and the impossibility of happiness (Monday imaginings)

…the shape of hills, the movement of water, muscles and the eye, the mechanism of the woodpecker’s tongue, the development of the foetus, creation, innovation, perspective and momentum.

Should I or he or she or they stay at home or go into care?

Locked in a room, when you are 90 and if you have dementia and significant physical and cognitive impairment is horrible. It is cruel and harmful. It is what our older folk have to do, whilst we, the rest are out and about, living it up.

Thinking mindful – geriatrician asks his followers to ‘get high’

My mind has been in a Japanese meta-reality rather than on Wong Lane

A confrontation with the awareness of my outdateness.

I don’t even want to talk about the masks. We were at a cinema in Bristol this evening to celebrate my birthday. We saw The Harder They Fall. No, it wasn’t the movie that made me realise how far away I am from where I could or should be, nor the paper cups we wereContinue reading “A confrontation with the awareness of my outdateness.”

Caveat emptor – learner beware.

That doctors and nurses aren’t working hard enough, that the poor are poor from choice, and, that good things come to those who deserve it or who were born lucky.

Israel / Sheffield / Palestine & Stone throwing

There are 8.8 million people living in Israel.

That is 0.11% of the world population.

Around 20 per cent of children in the UK’s 68 million are living in poverty.

Consider the involvement of Russia and China in perpetuating the Syrian crisis.

Klara, digital capital, Superman and me

When I say be me, that is, have integrated all my past memories, thoughts and ideas, my behaviours, imaginings, hopes, anxieties, abilities and failings.

State of frustration

I wanted to begin by discussing my recent practice FB post. I called it >very frustrating situation<. That was the best I could think at the time. What is or has been frustrating? Well, I won’t go on too much about Covid (lie). The vaccine has been rolling out over the past month. And, inContinue reading “State of frustration”

Today they took my dog’s womb.

The vet, Friendly young woman in dark blue scrubs Face mask and clipboard, Took me through The ins and outs of the procedure. Operation to render my dog Sterile. / My last dog Maisie Was also spayed Although I seem to have lost the memory. / Now, Stella, As she cowers, Under my desk, BesideContinue reading “Today they took my dog’s womb.”

Little hands, absent feet and beautiful people

Of the 147 initial survivors, by the time they were rescued 13 days later only 15 were still alive, the others had been murdered, cannibalised or thrown into the sea.

How long until I die? (Locked down and out in 2020)

Often old men and women will seek human contact, particularly when feeling isolated – and when I reciprocate with my gloved hand (that they don’t appear to notice as being anomalously purple or blue) we are able to make contact, to connect.

A long line of worriers and wear a facemask?

I come from a long line of worriers, which is apposite as the subject of this blog relates to discussions with my brother about Covid. You see, he has been a mask wearer. He also has asthma like me and the combination of worrier, asthma and the time of Covid is a toxic cocktail forContinue reading “A long line of worriers and wear a facemask?”

Waterstones – family trip to Sheffield, book buying and a form of review

After that last election, the one which brought the clown and his Merry Pranksters to power I deleted news and Social Media apps from my phone; it was only with the arrival of Covid that I allowed them back in.

Lockdown, solitary confinement and loneliness

Imagine the harm done to those people previously ‘living well’ with dementia who for six weeks have had a dramatic reduction in visitors and day-centre attendances; even the bitter-sweet routine trips to GP surgeries or hospitals have been done away with.

Covid has made me crepuscular

It’s odd. When I was a kid this was how I used to function; it appears to be happening again. Crepuscular is the behaviour displayed by certain animals who are active at dawn and dusk; not nocturnal, I suspect because their eyesight isn’t brilliant and they like their sleep and, neither diurnal as I guess,Continue reading “Covid has made me crepuscular”

In a few hours it will be Mother’s Day.

I feel awful. The message came through that the care home I support was opening for an hour to allow relatives to see their mums. Just an hour, strict hygiene, in the resident’s bedrooms. I asked the manager to stop. ‘If one person gets Covid, many will die.’ I said. It is almost impossible toContinue reading “In a few hours it will be Mother’s Day.”

Covid – My blog is calling (Week one, through a doctor/dad/outsider’s lens)

Fear of doing the wrong thing is a fundamental of quality improvement. If you are afraid to act because people might call you out or think you stupid, you won’t do anything, and the quality won’t improve. It won’t necessarily deteriorate either, yet, in times of radical change, that is worse.

Pishers, Michael Rosen, viral illness and the Passover story (timely I know, as it is Easter soon)

Well, talking with my family when I had the distinct need to panic buy and hoard face-masks and rubber gloves the other day, (I didn’t); not only is this deeply rooted in the brains of every one of us, it is (at least I believe) amplified in some groups.

This is black-belt medicine (areas of uncertainty in health and social care)

Ever been breathless at three in the morning? Do you have any strategies to sort yourself out, particularly when to begin you have a bad chest?

What will happen tomorrow if Labour don’t win the election

I don’t usually go-in for prediction. Sure, I think about the future, speculate on what might be, but jumping ahead 48 hours isn’t my usual thing. Tick, tock. It feels like one of those death clocks counting down. Measuring the minutes until everything is over. What happens? I don’t want to think about how IContinue reading “What will happen tomorrow if Labour don’t win the election”

Hospital

You see, The Plan says that more will be invested into community care, yet, the cumbersome nature of the NHS, again, the upside-down system of health and social care has resulted in lots or organisation and reorganisation but little transformational thought, little concept of how we can do things differently.

My Job

Mostly, my approach is to consider that we, that is the community services (those outside the acute hospital) can and do support a far broader range of patients than people realise and, when working well together, can care for a significant proportion of the people who otherwise arrive at the door of A&E.